EcoWeek ’22 ends with the ‘Plastic Bag Store’

UPDATE May 10: EcoWeek, Arlington’s annual invitation to welcome spring by encouraging the public to envision a green future, runs for more than a week, April 22 through May 10.

To see the full series of events here >>

The range of activities offers everyone the opportunity to learn, reflect and act.

Community and student groups and City of Arlington departments will provide presentations, tours and interactive events to inspire connection and celebration of our natural world.

Reducing our carbon footprint and protecting our natural resources is in our community as well as in our personal interest.

What we do at home

EcoWeek will highlight the importance of what we do at home and as a wider community to learn, take action and prepare for the weather, public health and economic changes we will face as our climate changes.

Previously held as EcoFest, a one-day event hosted at Arlington City Hall, since 2019 this event has morphed into a week or more of education. Topics include options for renewable electricity, local plants and wildlife; methods to reduce, reuse and recycle everyday objects; and the impact of public art on our global environment.

Members of the community are invited to participate in the many events. Among them are trash cleanup, document shredding, bicycle donations and clothing swaps.

Events include:
  • Recycle your textiles: worn and torn, donate them all.
  • Possibilities to opt for 100% renewable electricity.
  • Public art and our environment. See the film “Plastic Bag Store” on May 10 at the Regent. More here >> Or sign up to watch at home >>

Already detained:

Thursday, May 5, at 7:00 p.m., the panel links housing to action against climate change: The Department of Planning and Community Development is hosting a virtual panel of housing and climate experts who will share their work on housing and climate policy, as well as environmentally friendly home construction and renovation. Presentations, followed by a lively question-and-answer session, will explore opportunities to improve public health, environmental quality and transportation options while reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, pollutants that cause climate change. Learn more about the event, the panelists and register now >>

From April 29 to May 2, BioBlitz! focuses on finding and identifying as many species as possible in a specific area in a short time. During a BioBlitz, scientists, families, students, teachers and other community members work together to get a snapshot of an area’s biodiversity. Help locate and map local plants and wildlife – be a citizen scientist with City Nature Challenge and iNaturalist. Learn more >>

May 1 Zero Waste Day: Fixit Clinic, clothing exchange and youth climate workshops Sunday, May 1, all events are free and open to all, Thompson School, 187 Everett St. Find exact times at arlingtonma.gov/ecoweek.

Secure Document Shredding April 30, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: For Arlington residents only, two boxes/bags per household, free and no registration required, at the Reuse and Recycling Center, 33 Ryder St., cash donations accepted for FoodLink and Arlington Eats. Learn more.

Bike donation bonanza on April 30: Donate your unused or underused bike to a good cause. Arlington Pathfinders will help collect bikes for the Lowell Bike Connector. Anyone who rides a bike: Come meet members of the Arlington Police Department’s Bike Unit and get some great safety tips. The event will take place on April 30, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the Reuse and Recycling Center, 33 Ryder Street. Please park at the Ed Burns Arena (422 Summer Street) and walk the Minuteman Bike Path. Learn more about Bike Donation Bonanza.

April 26 Virtual Biodiversity Summit
Come learn what is happening in our community and at the state level to protect the biodiversity we all depend on. Topics include protecting pollinators and native habitat, and removing invasive plants. Learn more here >>

The City of Arlington has been an environmental leader in our region.

–David Morgan

Panel aims to link housing to action on climate change
Virtual event 7 p.m. May 5

At 7 p.m. in May, the City of Arlington’s Department of Planning and Community Development (DPCD) will host a virtual panel that will feature a discussion on the connections between climate and housing goals at the local and state levels, as well as specific case studies in the region that illustrate how these intersections are taking place on the ground.

Panelists will share their work on housing and climate policy and on environmentally sustainable home construction and renovation. Presentations, followed by a lively question-and-answer session, will explore opportunities to improve public health, environmental quality and transportation options while reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, pollutants that cause climate change.

Learn more about the event, the panelists, register >>

“Whether we build new homes or retrofit existing ones, the decisions we make about building efficiency and fuel choice determine how much those homes will contribute to additional global warming and the potential for catastrophic climate change,” said Brucie Moulton, co-chair of Sustainable Arlington and moderator of the panel. “Homes can be designed to protect against climate-induced extreme weather and also help reduce the likelihood that these extremes will become more significant in the future.”

The panel will also include representatives from DPCD, who will discuss the intersections between the city’s ongoing efforts to address climate change and improve housing affordability, access and choice. These include the city’s Net Zero Action Plan and Connect Arlington Sustainable Transportation Plan, and the new housing plan. The goals set forth in these plans are aligned with state and regional efforts to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions, improve housing choice and affordability, and improve public health, the quality of environment, efficiency and mobility.

“The Commonwealth and the city have many different policies and programs aimed at increasing climate action and housing preservation and creation,” says Jennifer Raitt, Director of DPCD. “Housing policy intersects with environmental justice, equity and affordability. offer an opportunity to learn more about how aligning housing and climate policies can improve outcomes and increase benefits for everyone. “

David Morgan, environmental planner and conservation officer with the Arlington Department of Planning and Community Development, says, “Arlington is an engaged community where environmental issues are a central concern.

“EcoWeek showcases the important work Arlington residents do, from encouraging biodiversity to planning for climate change. The City of Arlington has been an environmental leader in our region. Initiatives like EcoWeek demonstrate how Arlington is working toward a future where all living things — and the ecosystems we depend on — thrive.

Arlington School Sustainability Coordinator Rachel Oliveri said Arlington youth will play a key role in EcoWeek events, leading workshops on climate change and climate justice, hosting sales baking to promote local sustainability initiatives and creating media and public art to raise awareness of the importance of native plants and pollinators.

“Arlington EcoWeek is important to the city because we are a community that cares deeply about reducing our environmental impact and protecting our green spaces, waterways and wildlife,” she said.

Contact Charlotte Milan by email at This email address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Additional Resources
  • Boston Area Metropolitan Planning Commission Long Range Transportation Plan: ctps.org/lrtp

February 18, 2019: EcoFest ’19 points to the local energy future

February 6, 2018: EcoFest 2018 (Greenward) drives 500 people to City Hall
March 21, 2016: Climate change theme brings over 400 people to flood EcoFest

This announcement by Lynette Aznavour was published on Tuesday, April 4, 2022 and updated on May 4.

Bryce K. Locke