Plastic waste has now infiltrated every part of the ocean




A new report from WWF has warned that tiny plastic fragments have reached even the most seemingly pristine regions of the planet and called for urgent efforts to create an international treaty to address the problem.


LAST PUBLISHED
09.02.2022 | 2:30 p.m. IST



In this file photo taken on January 21, 2020, a man paddles a boat as <a class=plastic bags float on the surface of the Buriganga River in Dhaka. WWF sought to strengthen the case for action in its latest report, which synthesizes more than 2,000 separate scientific studies on the impacts of plastic pollution on the oceans, biodiversity and marine ecosystems.”/>

In this file photo taken on January 21, 2020, a man paddles a boat as plastic bags float on the surface of the Buriganga River in Dhaka. WWF sought to strengthen the case for action in its latest report, which synthesizes more than 2,000 separate scientific studies on the impacts of plastic pollution on the oceans, biodiversity and marine ecosystems.
(AFP)


This file photo taken on September 15, 2019 shows a diver picking up plastic and other litter in a bay during a campaign to

This file photo taken on September 15, 2019 shows a diver picking up plastic and other litter in a bay during an ocean “clean-up day” campaign off Goree Island. The plastic has seeped into all parts of the ocean and is now found in the smallest plankton to the largest whale, WWF said on Tuesday.
(AFP)


In this file photo taken on January 19, 2021, a wave carrying <a class=plastic waste and other rubbish washes up on a beach in Koh Samui in the Gulf of Thailand. According to some estimates, between 19 and 23 million tonnes of plastic waste are released into the world’s waterways each year, explains the WWF report.”/>

In this file photo taken on January 19, 2021, a wave carrying plastic waste and other rubbish washes up on a beach in Koh Samui in the Gulf of Thailand. According to some estimates, between 19 and 23 million tonnes of plastic waste are released into the world’s waterways each year, explains the WWF report.
(AFP)


In this file photo taken on April 19, 2021, a man picks up trash, including plastic waste, on Costa del Este beach in Panama City.  Single-use plastics still make up more than 60% of marine pollution, although more and more countries are taking steps to ban their use.

In this file photo taken on April 19, 2021, a man picks up trash, including plastic waste, on Costa del Este beach in Panama City. Single-use plastics still make up more than 60% of marine pollution, although more and more countries are taking steps to ban their use.
(AFP)


This file photo from June 7, 2020 shows a view of litter on Santa Lucia Beach in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico, on the eve of World Oceans Day.  In a 2021 study, 386 species of fish ingested plastic, out of 555 tested.

This file photo from June 7, 2020 shows a view of litter on Santa Lucia Beach in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico, on the eve of World Oceans Day. In a 2021 study, 386 species of fish ingested plastic, out of 555 tested.
(AFP)


In this file photo taken on June 5, 2020, officers from the Environmental Protection Division of the police take part in a beach clean-up effort at Mount Lavinia, on the outskirts of Colombo.  WWF is calling for talks to develop an international plastics agreement at the UN environment meeting, February 28-March 2 in Nairobi.

In this file photo taken on June 5, 2020, officers from the Environmental Protection Division of the police take part in a beach clean-up effort at Mount Lavinia, on the outskirts of Colombo. WWF is calling for talks to develop an international plastics agreement at the UN environment meeting, February 28-March 2 in Nairobi.
(AFP)







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Bryce K. Locke